Thursday, June 15, 2017

Poetry Friday


Father's Day

I don’t remember him.
(He left when I was three.)


He never ever calls.
He doesn't visit me.


I hug my pillow close
pretending it’s my dad.


Growing up without him—
makes my heart feel sad.


If he were here with me,
I know what I would say:


I still love you, Daddy.
Happy Father’s Day.



©Linda Kulp Trout



I had planned to write a happy poem to celebrate Father's Day.  Instead, I kept thinking about how for many children, Father's Day is difficult.  This is the poem that wanted to be written tonight.  It still needs work, but here's what I have so far.

A big thank you to Carol for hosting today's Poetry Friday.






14 comments:

  1. So glad you have written this poem. Most of my students and my sons (I adopted them from the foster care system) do not have dads. Their grief on pretty much any holiday is raw and palpable…

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  2. Poignant poem all the way through. I wondered when I heard a thing on the radio this morning (twice!) that said, "Because he gave you a $20 when you asked for a $10 and didn't ask for change -- Happy Father's Day!" It seems like a) dads get reduced to being money suppliers too much and b) ouch for people who don't have enough to give their kids a spare $10. /rant

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  3. What a bittersweet poem. The emotions are very palpable.

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  4. It is something to ponder for sure. I am moved by your first draft. It addresses a reality for so many. The comfort it provides is so necessary.

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  5. Thanks for writing this. I read mother's day poems with my students and I always include at least one that's about a complicated mother/kid relationship.

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  6. Such an important perspective, Linda - so grateful you shared. My relationship with my dad was complicated, and kids with so many different experiences do need to see their lives reflected in poetry.

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  7. What a caring poem, Linda. Although I had a wonderful stepfather, on Father's Day it was hard to know in my childhood what to do about celebrating my father (killed in WWII) as well as my step-father. And as Tabatha wrote, the stereotypes that don't fit so many are so hard on kids. Thanks!

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  8. It is the reality for so many. I am always amazed by those children--like the speaker in your poem--who remain willing to offer their love despite the hurt parents and others have caused.

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  9. A poem that needed to be written. Thank you, Linda.

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  10. Those invisible ties that bind us... Family plays such an important part in shaping our lives - even when they aren't there. What a beautiful heart you have, to hear this poem...

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  11. This is an important poem. Thank you for your empathy.

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  12. Heartbreaking, and yes, it is sadly true for some of my students. -- Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/

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  13. Oh my. Thanks for listening to what wanted to come out.

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  14. Awww. That was an endearing voice.

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